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National Water Harvesting and Storage Authority

Hifadhi Maji, Boresha Maisha

Whistle- blower Policy

NWHSA’s WHISTLE BLOWER POLICY

The Public Service Commission (PSC) in conjunction with the State Corporation Advisory Committee (SCAC) issued the code of Governance for State Corporations; Mwongozo Code in 2015 to guide operations of State Corporations.  The Mwongozo Code advocates for ethical leadership, best practices in Corporate Governance and prudent management of public resources.

While the government has initiated various reforms to curb corruption in the country, there is need for concerted efforts to ensure success. Article 5 of The United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) recognizes the core principles associated with the prevention of corruption in the public sector i.e. the rule of law, proper management of public affairs and public property, integrity, transparency and accountability.  Corruption is a vice that needs to be nipped in the bud as it poses serious social and economic risks and ultimately affect the reputation of an organization.

National Water Harvesting and Storage Authority (NWHSA) has the core mandate to “Undertake on behalf of the national government, the development of national public water works for water resources storage and flood control.” In this respect, the Authority recognizes that corruption can adversely affect its performance and ultimately its reputation.  This therefore calls for transparent implementation of projects while ensuring value for money. The Authority further recognizes that all its other areas of operations are prone to potential corruption risk.

It is on this back drop that we have developed the Authority’s Anti-corruption policy whose main objective is to provide a framework to combat corruption and unethical conduct.  The policy will further lay a firm foundation that will develop a culture of accountability and transparency through development of procedures of managing corruption risks at the Authority.

This policy will supplement the existing legal provisions and other government initiatives for fighting and preventing corruption in Kenya.  The Authority also believes that existence of a good regulatory framework provides a sound structure for the Management of public resources as entrenched in the Public Finance Management Act, 2012. (PFM Act, 2012)

Management through the leadership of the Board has ensured that this policy is formulated hence it shall apply the same enthusiasm in its implementation. Most importantly, management will ensure all stakeholders have been sensitized on corruption prevention mechanisms through a participatory approach so as to ensure effective and efficient implementation of the policy.

The Acting Chief Executive Officer CS. Sharon Obonyo says whistleblowing is becoming more accepted as a way for organizations to access internal information that would have otherwise remained secret hence becoming a risk to the organization. A whistle blower policy provides confidentiality of all informers who wish to report any issues that they feel are unethical.

The main objective of this policy is to encourage openness and transparency while guaranteeing protection of the whistle blowers. It is on this premise that I present this Whistle Blowing Policy to NWHSA’s staff, Board of Directors and our stakeholders. This policy will play a crucial role in ensuring we uphold integrity, accountability and fairness.

The policy has been developed in line with the provisions of the Constitution of Kenya 2010, particularly Chapter Six and Article 10 on Leadership and Integrity and National Values and Principles of Governance respectively.

PURPOSE

The purpose of this policy is to provide internal mechanisms to encourage all stakeholders to report suspected or actual unethical practices.  It will also guide on procedures for handling whistle blower reports, feedback, and responsibility of all stakeholders and protection of whistle blowers.  It is designed to ensure good corporate governance through transparency and integrity as outlined in our core values.  

This will ensure employees can raise concerns of unethical conduct without fear of suffering retribution and provide a transparent and confidential process for dealing with such concerns in line with the various statutes which include but not limited to Constitution of Kenya, 2010, Witness Protection Act, 2010, Bribery Act, 2016, Access to Information Act, 2016, Anti-Corruption & Economic Crimes Act (ACECA), 2003, United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) 2003 and International Labor Organization (ILO).

The policy will help to mitigate against risks through discovery of malpractices in good time to avoid risks such as loss of funds and others that would have a negative impact on the performance of the Authority.  When we win the war against corruption, we shall enjoy far reaching benefits and create a conducive work environment where service to the public takes center stage.

 

Written by: Joyce Jepkemboi

Chief Corporate Communications Officer

7th July, 2021

Anti-Corruption Policy

Anti-Corruption Policy

 The Authority is committed to ensuring zero tolerance to corruption hence we have put in place measures to curb corruption and promote integrity as enshrined in our value system. It is on this back drop that we have developed the Authority’s Anti-corruption policy whose main objective is to provide a framework to combat corruption and unethical conduct.  The policy will further lay a firm foundation that will develop a culture of accountability and transparency through development of procedures of managing corruption risks at the Authority.

The Public Service Commission (PSC) in conjunction with the State Corporation Advisory Committee (SCAC) issued the code of Governance for State Corporations; Mwongozo Code in 2015 to guide operations of State Corporations.  The Mwongozo Code advocates for ethical leadership, best practices in Corporate Governance and prudent management of public resources.

The Authority has the core mandate to “Undertake on behalf of the national government, the development of national public water works for water resources storage and flood control.” In this respect, the Authority recognizes that corruption can adversely affect its performance and ultimately its reputation.  This therefore calls for transparent implementation of projects while ensuring value for money.

While the government has initiated various reforms to curb corruption in the country, there is need for concerted efforts to ensure success. Article five of The United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) recognizes the core principles associated with the prevention of corruption in the public sector i.e. the rule of law, proper management of public affairs and public property, integrity, transparency and accountability. 

This policy will supplement the existing legal provisions and other government initiatives for fighting and preventing corruption in Kenya.  The Authority also believes that existence of a good regulatory framework provides a sound structure for the Management of public resources as entrenched in the Public Finance Management Act, 2012. (PFM Act, 2012)

The Ag. Chief Executive Officer CS. Sharon Obonyo says that the Authority is committed to ensuring integrity and accountability is restored and sustained. Management through the leadership of the Board has ensured that this policy is formulated hence it shall apply the same enthusiasm in its implementation. Most importantly, management will ensure all stakeholders have been sensitized on corruption prevention mechanisms through a participatory approach so as to ensure effective and efficient implementation of the policy.

 

 

The CEO thanked everyone who participated in the development of the policy noting that the teams worked jointly in its development and expects compliance with all its provisions and procedures. 

The Policy

 

The Anti-corruption policy outlines the principles that the Authority and its regions collectively shall follow to achieve zero tolerance against corruption.  The objective of this policy is to ensure that appropriate Anti-Corruption procedures are put in place across the Authority to avoid any violations of relevant laws and regulations pertaining to corruption prevention.

This policy applies to all officers, Board of Directors and third parties in all aspects of the operations of the Authority.  Violation of this policy will be sanctioned including where appropriate disciplinary procedures up to and including termination of employment and possible referral to the appropriate criminal or regulatory authorities.  The Authority is committed to doing business with institutions that do not condone corruption.

National values and principles of good governance are enshrined in the Constitution of Kenya, 2010 Article 10.  Similarly, Chapter 6 on leadership and integrity expects all public officers and public entities to ensure personal integrity, competence, suitability, fairness, objectivity and accountability. 

The Government developed the National Ethics and Anti-corruption policy in 2018 which is anchored on the political pillar of Vision 2030.  Public institutions were expected to develop tailor made Anti-corruption policies within their Organizations.

It is on this premise that the Authority has developed this Anti-corruption policy to act as an internal framework on matters corruption prevention while reducing levels of corruption prevalence and unethical practices within the Authority.

CORRUPTION RISK ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT 

Corruption risk assessment and management is an essential part of an organization’s corruption prevention strategy. It is the process of determining an organization’s exposure to the threat of corruption and proposing mitigation measures aimed at eliminating the threat. The Corruption Prevention Committee shall therefore formulate and implement a comprehensive Corruption Prevention Plan (CPP) in line with this policy.

The Authority’s leadership will be at the forefront in championing for corruption prevention within and outside the Authority through intense creation of awareness among staff and its stakeholders. NWHSA’s Anti-Corruption Policy has been developed to govern corruption prevention, detection and response in the Authority.

The Authority will perform annual corruption risk assessment to create awareness on combating corruption among staff and stakeholders to foster an organizational culture in which corruption is not tolerated. Further the Authority will ensure that all its stakeholders are made aware of the existence of the Anti-corruption policy.

Through the Anti-Corruption Policy, the Authority stands to benefit in fighting the vice by receiving corruption related information from the stakeholders. The policy therefore aims to minimize and ultimately eradicate corruption within the Authority.

 

Written by CPA Philip Nzengu

Chief Internal Auditor

5th July, 2021

 

Napuu Water Project

 

 

Napuu water project in Turkana County is now headed to the final stages of project completion. All the materials and items needed for completion of the project have now been delivered on site. These are; solar panels, pump, motor & accessories. The Authority aims to complete and hand over the project to the county government of Turkana by Mid-May 2021.

 Turkana Deputy Governor H.E Hon Peter Lotethiro toured the project on Monday 26th April 2021 to assess progress and asked NWHSA to fast track the project so as to alleviate water challenges facing residents of Napuu area. The Authority has committed to ensure project completion and handover as per the new schedule. We thank the County government of Turkana for the partnership and patience.

Napuu Water project is set to benefit over 16,000 residents of Narewa, Lokitela, Ekaales, Mathewan, Kasarani, Julik and Trans- Africa. Water from Napuu will also be connected to Kisumu Polytechnic, Turkana University College and Kanamkemer ward sub- county Hospital.

 

Written by:

Joyce Jepkemboi

Chief Communications Officer

28th April, 2021

The New ISO Standard

ISO 9001:2015 is an International Standard dedicated to Quality Management Systems (QMS). It outlines a framework for improving quality and set procedures through which an organization carries out its operations in a consistent manner to meet the requirements and expectations of its stakeholders effectively and efficiently. The new standards were published in 2015, giving institutions a three year transition period to upgrade their ISO 9001:2008 certification to ISO 9001:2015. In view of this, National Water Harvesting and storage authority (NWHSA) has started a road map towards certification for the the  new standard; ISO 9001:2015.

The Authority through the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS) in conjunction with the National Quality Institute (NQI)   has already trained several staff who will take lead  in the implementation of the new standard, on the Quality Management System (QMS) implementation Course.

Acting Chief Executive Officer CS. Sharon Obonyo thanks KEBS for their support and urges all staff to embrace the new standard saying this will help promote best practices in the Authority hence, ensure efficient operations such as prudent financial management, improvement in turnaround time and service delivery. CS. Obonyo graced the staff trainings and reiterated management’s commitment in the implementation of the new standard.

Training

The four day course sought to help participants understand the basic concepts of quality management, the requirements of ISO 9001:2015 standard and acquire and be able to apply knowledge and skills to implement the QMS based on the new standard.

Dennis Osoro and Nancy Rotich who are members of the ISO implementation Committee helped us to unbundle the new standard and gave us highlights of the same.

 Difference between the old and the new ISO 9001:2015 standard

Quality Manual: it is no longer a title specific requirement. The new requirement for “Documented information” gives greater freedom on how this is implemented.

Management Representative: This was a tittle used in the ISO 9001:2008 standard. The new standard requires that management appoints a team leader who will oversee its implementation and will be called a Quality Management Champion.

Preventive Action: The change from “preventive action” to “risk and opportunity” is an example of a where management is required to adopt risk-based thinking so as to prevent potential risks and capitalize on new opportunities.

Quality management System and its processes: This approach requires that an organization shall establish, implement, maintain and continually improve a QMS while managing inter-related processes.

The new ISO Standard

 Risk based thinking: As already noted, the Authority will be required to do a risk assessment then come up with risk mitigation measures.

Interested Parties: this has been added to clause 4.2 but with the precaution that it is “relevant interested parties”. To be relevant, the interested party must have some actual or potential impact on the quality of the goods and services.

Control of changes: this is aimed at ensuring that review or any changes in production or service provision is necessary to ensure continued conformity with requirements.

Leadership: top management shall demonstrate leadership and commitment to QMS and offer strategic direction.

Achieving the ISO 9001:2015 standard is not about establishing a set of procedures that are complicated and difficult to manage. The aim is to provide a workable management system that is suitable for the institution. With the right support and the knowledge of the employees, the institution will establish a system that will improve all areas of its operations. Most importantly, implementing an effective and robust ISO 9001:2015 Quality Management System (QMS) will help the institution to focus on the important areas in regard to its mandate and improve efficiency.

The Authority is in the right track in aligning its processes towards the ISO 9001:2015. After training of the implementors, QMS internal auditors from the Authority will also be trained after which all staff will be sensitized before implementation of the new standard. It is after meeting all these requirements that the Authority will be certified.  

 

 Written by Dennis Osoro &

Nancy Rotich

 Published on 5th March, 2021

 

The proposed Soin - Koru Dam is located in Kisumu and Kericho Counties (Nyando & Ainamoi Sub-Counties) across River Nyando, approximately 5km upstream of Muhoroni Town. River Nyando is one of the seven major rivers within the Lake Victoria Basin originating from the upper highland areas and flows into Lake Victoria.

The Dam is one of the two large dam projects in Vision 2030 flagship projects meant for flood control among other functions.  Other dams in vision 2030 blue print include: Maruba Dam in Machakos County (completed), Chemususu Dam in Koibatek, Baringo County (Completed), Kiserian Dam in Kajiado County (completed), Muruny (Siyoi) Dam in West Pokot County (on-going).

Studies for Soin-Koru Dam were started in 1982 by the Italian government and taken over by National Water Conservation & Pipeline Corporation (NWCPC) in 2009. The Proposed position for embankment is the slopes of Got Alila hill in Muhoroni (Kisumu County) and slopes of Koitatui hill in Soin (Kericho County).  An area of 2,500 acres will be acquired for the project with parcels of land in both Kericho and Kisumu counties.

The dam has a water catchment area of 8,175km squire and a storage capacity of 93.7 MM3      It will supply water to a population of 1,707,740 persons in both counties.

 Project’s major components

Rockfill dam of 54 m height

Water treatment works of 71,279m3/day

Trunk distribution pipelines of diameters 1200-150mm and of total length of 122.54km

12 No. storage tanks of total capacity of 23,400m3

5MW hydropower generating plant

Development of community water projects at KShs.300 million

 Benefits of the project

The dam will alleviate the impacts of floods in the lower reaches of River Nyando. Flooding within lower reaches of Kano plains displaces about 5,000 people yearly costing Kshs. 49 million due to damages and further Kshs. 30 million for rehabilitation measures.

The benefits of the dam also extend to water supply of 71,279m3/day for domestic, commercial and institutional use 80% of which will be gravity flow. All residents near the dam site and downstream of the dam site will be served with water to supplement the existing facilities. The city of Kisumu and the emerging towns of Ahero, Chemilil, Miwani, Muhoroni, Koru, Awasi, Katito, Masogo and Ombeyi will be major beneficiaries.

The areas to be served in Kericho County include Koitaburot and surrounding areas, AlKechiryet, Kapkormom, Koguta, Kipsitet, Soliat, Katito and the surrounding areas. Others include Improvement of Chebululu, Sigowet and Chesiche water projects to increase capacity to serve surrounding schools and communities.

The current water supply for Kisumu Town & the satellite towns is approximately 18,000m3/day against a demand of approx. 66,000m3/day. The proposed dam will provide additional water supply of approx. 71,279m3/day of potable water to a population of 1,707,740 persons. This will augment existing schemes and is sufficient for the regional demand for the next 20 years.

The other dam benefits include increased area under irrigation schemes in and around Ahero and West Kano by 2,500 Ha and also power generation of approximately 2.5 MW. This would be used for pumping water to higher areas while excess power will be sold to Kenya Power. This translates to cheaper water and additional income to the two counties.

Compensation for the land will be done in a fair and transparent way where the views of all the affected persons will be considered which will result in fair and adequate compensation. Further public engagements and consultations with all stakeholders will provide the Authority an opportunity to ensure that consideration is given to stakeholders’ concerns. 

 Project cost

The approximate cost for dam & water supply components is KShs.30 Billion while land compensation cost is approximately KShs.2 Billion totaling to KShs.32 Billion. The Government of Kenya will fund the project and has already committed a total of KShs.25 Billion which will undertake compensation and dam component.

Implementation

The project is divided into two components for ease of implementation as follows:

Lot 1- Dam Component (Dam, hydropower plant & Raw water Main)-estimated to cost KShs.25 billion together with compensation for land.

Lot 2- Water Supply Component (Water treatment works, distribution pipework and storage tanks) (estimated to cost KShs.7 billion).

Procurement for a contractor and supervising consultant for Lot 1 (Dam Component) has commenced in a process scheduled to be completed by end of July 2020.

The Authority is currently holding public participation forums with various stakeholders to ensure smooth implementation of the project. We are also working with the National Lands Commission to ensure any contentious issues relating to land and compensation is resolved amicably.

 

By Joyce Jepkemboi

19th June, 2020

Subcategories

ITEM

COUNTY

SUB-COUNTY

NAME OF DAM/PAN

BENEFICIARIES

(PERSONS)

CAPACITY

CURRENT STATUS

1

Baringo

Mogotio

Rehabilitation of Oldebes borehole

150 Families

800 Cattle

3,000 Goats

10 cubic per hour

NWHSA Mobilization to site in progress.

2

Kajiado

Isinya

Kitengela Boarding Baorehole

500 school children

250 families

850 cattle

2,000 Goats

-

NWHSA drilling team at site drilling.

3

Tana River

Bondeni

Bondeni Borehole

280 Families

1,600 Cattle

5,000 Goats

 -

Tendering

4

Wajir

Hebaswein

Bulla Juu

167 families

4000 Cattle

6,000 Goats

-

Tendering

5

Turkana

Turkana Central

Lochar Ekeny Borehole

290 families

2,000 Cattle

4,300 Goats

-

 Tendering

6

Baringo

Koibatek

Perkerra borehole

200 families

1,350 cattle

5,200 Goats

-

NWHSA  drilling team mobilizing to site

7

Wajir, Garissa, Marsabit,West Pokot, Kajiado

 

All need areas within the targeted counties.

10,000 families

-

Repaired  6 water bowsers for water tracking.

 

Moses Gitonga Ntiritu Works